Tag Archives: vegetarian

3 Healthy Simple To Make Tasty Fruit Smoothies

 

Svenska: Tropical Smoothie
Svenska: Tropical Smoothie (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Sweet Beta Carotene Blast

2 apricots (sliced and pitted)

1/2 papaya (frozen in chunks)

1/2 mango (frozen in chunks)

1/2 cups carrot juice

1 tablespoon honey

Add ingredients (except for honey) to blender in the order listed, then blend on high speed for 30 seconds.

Add honey and blend a few seconds more.

Option: add a few teaspoons of fresh orange juice for a looser consistency.

 

 

Vanilla Banana Carob Smoothie

5 dates pitted and soaked in water for 20 minutes

1 cup nut or grain milk

1 frozen banana cut in chunks

3‐4 tablespoons carob powder

A dash of vanilla or fresh vanilla beans

Place dates in a small bowl with just enough water to cover. Let them soak 20 minutes, drain off water.

In a blender, combine dates, nut milk, banana, carob powder and vanilla.

Blend until smooth. Drink it up!

 

 

Island Gingah Rootz Smoothie

1 apple, cored, peeled

lemon juice from 1 lemon, no seeds

1/2 cups filtered water

1 (2‐inch) piece fresh ginger root, sliced

A great smoothie to calm your tummy.

Blend all ingredients until smooth.

Slip smoothie slowly

Sea Vegetables: Super vegetables from the sea that has been held to posses many powers to prevent diseases, lengthen the life span, and aid in beauty and optimal health.

The consumption of sea vegetables enjoys a long history throughout the world. Archaeological evidence suggests that Japanese cultures have been consuming sea vegetables for more than 10,000 years. In ancient Chinese cultures, sea vegetables were a noted delicacy, suitable especially for honored guests and royalty. Korea, Vietnam, and Malaysia are other Asian countries where sea vegetables are widely consumed. Yet, sea vegetables were not just limited to being a featured part of Asian cuisines. In fact, most regions and countries located by waters, including Scotland, Ireland, Norway, Iceland, New Zealand, the Pacific Islands and coastal South American countries have been consuming sea vegetables since ancient times.

If the only seaweed you’ve ever eaten is the nori wrapped around a sushi roll, then you’ll be excited to discover an abundant variety of sea vegetables! These super, dark green vegetable are extremely nourishing because they are grown.  When naturally and organically grown, they provide a source  of nutrient that is not available in foods grown in your garden. All see vegetable are excellent brain food.  Sea vegetables are capable of binding with heavy metals and radioactive toxins in the body to safely escort them out of the body.

This include kelp, wakame, kombu, arame, hijiki, nori, sea moss,  chlorella and spirulina. They contain Vitamin B12 and K, organic sodium, organic iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, vanadium,  zinc and in some cases (like iodine) .   The vanadium content of sea vegetables is an area of special interest with respect to their mineral content. While research in this area remain inconclusive, sea vegetables may be able to help us increase our cells’ sensitivity to insulin, help us prevent overproduction of glucose by our cells, and help us take existing blood sugars and convert them into storable starches. All of these factors would help us increase our blood sugar control, and lower our risk of type 2 diabetes. There are many reasons why I recommend sea vegetables as part of my healing programs — weight loss, cellulite control, detoxification, beautiful hair and skin, and more. Sea vegetables can transform your health!

 

Sea vegetables come in green, brown, red and blue-green algae. A quick profile: 

Arame – This mild, almost sweet brown kelp is a great place to begin if you’re unaccustomed to eating sea veggies. It’s usually found in finely shredded strands that have a crispy texture. Arame needs to be rinsed and then soaked in warm water for about 15 minutes.  It can be added raw to a garden fresh salad.  Arame has a sweet, mild flavor and is rich in calcium, potassium, iodine, Vitamin A and dietary fiber.  You can try it in omelets, stir-fries, or pasta salad.


Nori You’ll recognize nori as a common sushi wrapper. These “seaweed sheets” works great as wraps and taste delicious when toasted. you cal also purchase Nori already toasted. Thin, flat sheets of nori are typically used to make sushi rolls.    It is an excellent condiment for rice, salads, soups, and casseroles. A powerhouse of  beta carotene, vitamin C, folate, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, vitamin E, iodine, copper, iron, manganese,  protein,  phosphorus, potassium, calcium, zinc, sodium, omega 3.

Hijiki is called the “beauty vegetable” in Japan and is given credit for the long, lustrous black hair and beautiful skin of Japanese women. Research has shown that minerals are important to healthy hair growth, and hijiki has an incredible 34 grams of minerals per every 100 grams.  It can also improve the strength and condition of one’s hair. This sea vegetable looks like black angel hair pasta and requires soaking before it is added to vegetable dishes.  It also goes well with fish.  Hijiki is rich in dietary fiber, calcium, iron and magnesium.


Kombu – Popular ingredient in miso soup and other Japanese dishes. just put a small strip in water and simmer for 45 minutes or longer on low heat. Now you have a wonderful mineral-rich broth. Now, simple cook veggies, soups. or your grain-like seeds in this broth. A great anti-aging tip. Kombu gives a nice salty flavor to soups.  This sea vegetable has an attractive dark purple color and adds protein, calcium, iodine, magnesium and iron to your diet.  It also contains alginic acid that absorbs toxic heavy metals out of the body. Kombu can be added while dry to the cooking liquid for soups, beans or rice.  It doubles in volume when it soaks up water and turns soft as it cooks.  A strip of kombu cooked with beans helps reduce gas.


Wakame – Closely related to kombu, this variety was found to have fat burning properties that could fight obesity, according to research from Japan. Makes a great natural beauty aid. This very black sea veggies scares some people who are not used to black foods but please don’t back away from this nutritional powerhouse of beta carotene, vitamin E, folate, B1, B2, B3, B5, omega 3. After soaking for about 10 minutes in water, wakame expands up to seven times its original size.  When cooked, wakame becomes silky soft and almost melts in your mouth.  This sea vegetable supplies dietary fiber and potassium.  It can be eaten raw as a snack or added to soups, stir fries, salads or stews.  It’s a delicious way to add vital minerals to your favorite foods.


Dulse – a nutritional powerhouse, alkaline, beta carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, and most of the B vitamins, including B6, contains high levels of iodine, as well as calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, organic sodium and zinc. A quarter-ounce of dulse provides about 30 percent of the recommended daily allowance of iron, and one cup of dulse can provide 4 to 6 grams of protein. It is recommended to correct mineral deficiencies, anemia, for poor digestion, enlargement of the thyroid because of its high iodine content and for proper gland function. Dulse is said to be beneficial for impotence and under-weight . This reddish brown sea vegetable is full of potassium and protein.  Dulse flakes lend a nice salty flavor to salad.  It turns feather light and crispy when pan fried in oil.  Dulse can also be eaten straight out of the package like jerky.


Agar – Agar is wonderful for creating delicious sugar-free desserts. It is a vegetarian alternative to gelatin. It can be used in both sweet and savory dishes and has mild laxative properties…so can be helpful for those who suffer from constipation.


Kelp – A brown algae, kelp grows in nutrient-rich ocean water and is packed with vitamins, minerals and iodine. Kelp is thought to be especially useful for prostate, pancreas and digestive health. If you have a thyroid disorder like hypo-thyroid, hashimoto’s ( an autoimmune issue) and even hyperthyroid kelp is frequently recommended. Your thyroid needs minerals (like the ones found in ocean veggies) and certain fats to work well. A powerhouse  highly mineralized including trace minerals, folate, B2, B5, vitamin K, vitamin E, iodine, copper, magnesium, iron, manganese, phosphorus, calcium, zinc, sodium

Spirulina (an algae) – a true super food, chlorophyll rich, easily digestible, immune booster, anti-fungal, antibacterial, brain food, protein, GLA, RNA, DNA, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, folate, vitamin E, vitamin K, vitamin, copper, iron, sodium, manganese, magnesium, potassium, zinc, phosphorus, selenium, calcium, omega3, omega 6

Chlorella (an algae) – a true super food , chlorophyll rich, anti-cancer, heavy metal and synthetic toxin removal, RNA, DNA, protein, mineral rich. Chlorella is a single-celled algae originally produced as a source of protein for populations that could not afford animal protein foods. Yet chlorella offers more than protein. Miraculous stories have surfaced of people getting noticeable improvement in health and well being when consuming chlorella. When you realize that chlorella contains carotenoids, magnesium, and the super detoxifier chlorophyll-the health benefits of which have been well documented-we begin to understand chlorella’s healing power. Americans are chronically low in magnesium and in great need of detoxifying. Chlorella may be the perfect antidote to our refined foods, nutrient-poor diets and toxic environment.

Other types of edible seaweeds that can be added to your diet are;


Aonori- also known as green laver, is a type of edible green seaweed, including species from the genera Monostroma and Enteromorpha of Ulvaceae. It contains rich minerals such as calcium, magnesium, lithium, vitamins, and amino acids such as methionine. It is used in its dried form for Japanese soups, tempura, and material for manufacturing dried nori and tsukudani. It is also used in a powdered form, often blended with Ulva species of Ulvaceae as its production is limited. It is used commonly for flavouring of some Japanese foods, usually by sprinkling the powder on the hot food, for its aroma:

Aonori - Green Nori Flakes

Alaria- belongs to the genus Phaeophyta, which is a brown algae comprising around 17 species. This is one of the rare edible types of algae, which is found on the coastal British Isles, eastern Asia and south America. Alaria is an iodine rich seaweed and an excellent source of protein. The best thing about this type algae is that it is low fat and rich with various vitamins and minerals that make it as healthy as the terrestrial vegetation. Alaria is one of the best foods high in iodine and it is a common food item in the countries like Scotland, Ireland, Iceland, Greenland, Faroe Islands, Denmark, and the far east Asian seaweed consuming countries. Midribs of Alaria are not consumed while leaflets and blades are widely consumed.


Bladderwrack - Primary chemical constituents of this plant include mucilage, algin, mannitol, beta-carotene, zeaxanthin, iodine, bromine, potassium, volatile oils, and many other minerals. The main use of bladder wrack (and other types of seaweed) in herbal medicine is as a source of iodine, an essential nutrient for the thyroid gland. Bladder wrack has proved most useful in the treatment of underactive thyroid glands (hypothyroidism) and goitre. Bladder wrack has been shown to help women with abnormal menstrual cycling patterns and/or menstrual-related disease histories


Carola-(Callophyllis variegata is a type of edible marine seaweed, a member of red algae known in Concepción de Chile and other parts of South America like Peru, the Falkland Islands, Tierra del Fuego. But also in New Guinea, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Alaska, St. Paul Island (Indian Ocean), Antarctic and subantarctic islands such as the Graham Land, the Kerguelen, the Macquarie Island, South Georgia, the South Orkney Islands.


Dabberlocks (winged kelp)- is an edible seaweed, also known as dabberlocks or badderlocks, or winged kelp. It is a traditional food along the coasts of the far north Atlantic Ocean. It may be eaten fresh or cooked in Greenland, Iceland, Scotland and Ireland. It is the only one of twelve species of Alaria to occur in the British Isles.

Gim- is known to be abundant in protein and vitamins, especially vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, and B12. It is also known to have a high content of mineral salts, particularly iodine and iron, and essential amino acids and properties that dispose of cholesterol, earning its reputation as a “healthy food. Gim is known to grow well in sea water between 5 °C and 8 °C, so gim collection is usually done between December and January. Gim that has been grown for 50 days is considered best for consumption, as the color and flavor are at their best. Cultivation is done mostly in the regions of South Jeolla and South Gyeongsang, with the gim from Wando being the most famous

Irish Moss- is a red algae or purple seaweed super food that is a great energy booster. It revitalizes and strengthens the body and is good for thyroid disorders. It is a good source of calcium, magnesium, chlorophyll, phosphorus, potassium, iodine, and sulfur.  Not only do sea weeds provide iodine, they have a mucilaginous and bulking effect in the colon which helps to clean the colon and aid in the formation of stools, and very importantly, suppresses hunger (or appetite), something obese people need in order to lose weight

Laver- which is also called lava, is a type of kelp which is often included in the iodine rich foods list. It has higher levels of mineral salt and iron. Along with being one of the iodine rich seaweed types, laver is also a rich source of protein, vitamin A, vitamin B2 and vitamin C. Laver is used for making the tasty laverbread which is a traditional Welsh dish. Laverbread is traditionally served with cockles and fried bacon. Laver is also consumed in the form of salad, along with mutton and especially lamb.


Mozuku- is a type of edible seaweed in the genus Cladosiphon, naturally found in Okinawa, Japan. Most of the mozuku now is farmed by locals, and sold to processing factories. The main use of mozuku is as food, and as source of one type of sulfated polysaccharide called Fucoidan to be used in cancer treatment aid health supplements.

Ogonori- also called ogo or sea moss, is a type of edible seaweed eaten along the coasts of Japan, Southeast Asia, Hawaii, and the Caribbean. Ogonori is typically eaten cold and is a source of the thickener agar.


Sea Grape - is a genus of seaweeds in the family Caulerpaceae (among the green algae). They are unusual because they consist of only one cell with many nuclei, making them among the biggest single cells in the world. A species in the Mediterranean can have a stolon more than 3 metres (9 ft) long, with up to 200 fronds.  Some species (especially Caulerpa lentillifera and Caulerpa racemosa) are eaten under the names sea grape or green caviar or umi-budo in Okinawa. They have a peppery taste. Seagrapes are eaten in Indonesian cuisine, sometimes fresh, and othertimes coated in sugar. They are raised in Cebu, for domestic consumption in the Philippines as well as export to Japan.


Sea kale-  a halophytic perennial plant in the genus Crambe that grows wild along the coasts of Europe, from the North Atlantic to the Black Sea. It has large fleshy glaucous collard-like leaves and abundant white flowers. The seeds come one each in globular pods. The plant is sometimes grown as an ornamental but its most common use is as a blanched vegetable. Along the coast of England, where it is commonly found above High Tide Mark on shingle beaches, local people heaped loose shingle around the naturally occurring root crowns in springtime, thus blanching the emerging shoots. The shoots are served like asparagus: steamed, with either a bechamel sauce or melted butter, salt and pepper. It is apt to get bruised or damaged in transport and should be eaten very soon after cutting, this may explain its subsequent decline in popularity.


Sea Lettuce- Sea lettuce is eaten by a number of different sea animals, including manatees and the sea slugs known as sea hares. Many species of sea lettuce are a food source for humans in Scandinavia, Great Britain, Ireland, China, and Japan (where this food is known as aosa). Sea lettuce as a food for humans is eaten raw in salads and cooked in soups. It is high in protein, soluble dietary fiber, and a variety of vitamins and minerals, especially iron.


Sloke- edible seaweed that has a high mineral salt content, particularly iodine and iron. It is used for making laverbread, a traditional Welsh dish, as well as eaten as a complement to rice in Japan (where it is called nori) and Korea (where it is called kim or gim). Particularly in Korea, it is sometimes roasted with sesame oil and further flavored with salt and sometimes MSG. Laver is common around the west coast of Britain and east coast of Ireland along the Irish Sea as well as along the coasts of Japan and Korea. Laver is unique among seaweeds because it is only one cell thick.

Sea Palm (Postelsia Palmaeformis), American arame, grows only on the Pacific Coast of North America. One of my favorites, it has a sweet, salty taste that goes especially well as a vegetable, rice or salad topping.

Vitamin O : (L-Carnitine or Acetyl L-Carnitine): The vitamin that help transport fatty acids directly into the part of the cells that burn fat off of the body.

Vitamin O is considered to be a good vitamin for the body.  However, due to its chemical structure, which is similar to those amazing amino acids it is usually considered together with them. Its chemical name is L-Carnitine or Acetyl L-Carnitine. L-Carnitine is made in the body from the amino acids lysine and methionine. It increases the use of fat as an energy source by transporting fatty acids into the mitochondria, where they are ‘burned’ to release energy for body functions. The L-carnitine form may cause adverse side effects however. It is available in several different forms including propionyl-L-carnitine and acetyl-L-carnitine. Propionyl-L-carnitine, through its enhancement of metabolism has been proven to prevent ischemia-induced heart dysfunction, and acetyl-L-carnitine has been suggested to delay the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.  It exists in two stereoisomer forms namely:  L-carnitine which is the biologically active form.  D-carnitine which is the biologically not active form.

In fact, in several large clinical trials conducted in Italy, this nutrient has shown to have boastful favorable effects in helping people recover more quickly from heart attacks. For example, according to the well-renowned tome The Pill Book Guide to Natural Medicines written by Michael Murray N.D. who states:

“Subjects taking carnitine showed significant improvements in heart rate, blood pressure, angina attacks, rhythm disturbances, and clinical signs of impaired heart function compared to the subjects taking placebo.”

Benefits and functions of  Vitamin O (L-Carnitine or Acetyl L-Carnitine)

  • It’s primary role is to help transport fatty acids into the energy producing units in the cells – the mitochondria, where they can be converted to energy. This is a major source of energy for the muscles, including those of the heart. As such, carnitine increases the use of fat as an energy source.
  • It should be used in cases the kidney is damaged and person is undergoing dialysis. Because here its levels get low due to kidney disease.
  • In addition to producing energy, these two nutrients remove toxic accumulations of fatty acids from mitochondria, keeping these organelles healthy and functioning at their best. Energy production in mitochondria is not a perfect process and toxic metabolites do accumulate.
  • Carnitine improves recovery after heavy exercise and may be of use in improving exercise capacity of people with peripheral arterial disease.
  •  Carnitine moderately improves the duration of exercise and time to recovery in patients with chronic stable angina.
  • Vitamin O supplements are used in the treatment of heart disease because it provides beneficial effects to the angina in which chest pain of crushing nature occurs, and after myocardial infarction.
  • L -carnitine is beneficial for the neurotransmitter of our brain especially in adults where it improves their functions remarkably. It is beneficial in case of encephalopathy.
  • Carnitine has also been used for male infertility. Low sperm count and abnormal motility have been linked to low carnitine levels in men. Several studies have shown that L-carnitine helped increase sperm counts and motility.
  • Carnitine is manufactured by the body if sufficient amounts of iron, vitamin B1, vitamin C, niacin, vitamin B6, lysine, and methionine are available.
  •  Carnitine also enhances the effectiveness of antioxidant vitamins C and E.
  • L-Carnitine as been know to cure drepression.

Food source of Vitamin O (L-Carnitine or Acetyl L-Carnitine)

It is found in variety of seed such as sunflower seed, pumpkin seed, and sesame seeds. It is found in nuts, pulses, legumes, lentils, peas, peanuts, vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, garlic, parsley, beet green, etc, in fruits such as avocado, bananas and apricots as well as in whole wheat rye, rice, and wheat bran.

Deficiency of Vitamin O  (L-Carnitine or Acetyl L-Carnitine)

  • It can lead to osteoporosis because of its effect on the osteoblasts cells of the bones.
  • Fatty oxidation can also be impaired in case of its deficiency.
  • Beneficial antioxidant effects cannot be achieved.
  • Carnitine deficiencies are rare, even in strict vegetarians, because the body produces carnitine relatively easily.
  • Rare genetic diseases can cause a carnitine deficiency.
  • Carnitine deficiency is more likely to be found in persons experiencing complications of diabetes (such as retinopathy, hyperlipidemia, or neuropathy),

Seasonal Eating : What fruits, vegetables and herbs to enjoy this spring.

Any healthy lifestyle  will/should advocate that you incorporate fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season. Eating foods when nature produces them is what people the world over have done naturally through most of history, before mega-supermarkets dotted the landscape and processed foods became ubiquitous. Seasonal eating is also a cornerstone of several ancient and holistic medical traditions, which view it as integral to good health and emotional balance.

Ayurveda teaches us to differentiate between foods that are suitable for different climates and seasons. Each geographical area has its unique temperature, humidity and of course, the environmental conditions. Foods have to be classified likewise. Local and seasonal produce have robust flavors that are not lost unlike vegetables and fruits that are transported from across the globe.

During spring no need  to turn to  pills to fight the watery eyes and sniffles of a seasonal allergy? Food may do the trick.  Researchers have found that children who ate a Mediterranean diet — centered on produce, whole grains, lean protein and healthy fats like olive oil and nuts — were significantly less likely to have nasal allergies than kids who ate a standard American diet. The reason: The Mediterranean eating style cuts down on inflammation in the body, a main player in allergy symptoms.

Remember, spring begins in late March and runs until mid-June so if you can’t find a fruit or vegetable, ask your grocer when it will be in stock.  Availability will vary from region to region. To find a farmer’s market near you, visit www.localharvest.org, and enjoy the bounty of spring!

Vegetables

Fruits

  • Apple
  • Apricots
  • Avocado
  • Banana
  • Blueberries
  • Cantaloupe
  • Casaba Melon
  • Cherries
  • Currants
  • Figs
  • Grapes
  • Guavas
  • Jackfruit
  • Kumquat
  • Mango
  • Mandarins
  • Melon
  • Nectarines
  • Papayas
  • Peaches
  • Pineapples
  • Plums
  • Strawberries
  • Tangerines
  • Watermelon

Spring  Herbs (Seasonings)

  • Chives
  • Cilantro
  • Dill
  • Mint
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Sage
  • Scallions
  • Rosemary
  • Watercress
Our mother nature can take care of us more than any machine or technology invented in this world. More you switch to the fruits and vegetables in season, more healthier you will become. So, just concentrate on the seasonal foods and have a healthy life.

Vanadium : The trace mineral that have a role in the regulation of sodium and in the metabolism of glucose and lipids.

Vanadium was named after the Scandinavian goddess of beauty, youth, and luster. It is commonly found in vegetables and seafood.   It is a controversy as to whether vanadium is an essential trace mineral in human nutrition. Although it has been suggested to have a role in the regulation of sodium and in the metabolism of glucose and lipids.  Studies show that vanadium in the body works similar to insulin, i.e. it helps maintaining blood sugar levels. Basically when there is a high concentration of sugar or glucose in the blood stream, the body releases insulin hormone in order to tell the muscles, liver and fat tissues to utilize this glucose in the blood as a source of energy in place of stored fat as the main source of energy. As a result, the elevated glucose levels drop, subsequently the insulin levels also go down. Hence, such a person who has high blood sugar levels or uncontrolled insulin levels is considered to be suffering diabetes. Vanadyl sulfate is the most common and known form of vanadium.

The total amount of vanadium in the human body is estimated to be less than 1 milligram (0.000035 ounce). It is found most commonly in the kidneys, spleen, lungs, testes, and bones.

Function of Vanadium in Our Body

Deficiency Symptoms of Vanadium

  • Hypoglycemia, diabetes, increased dental cavities, elevated triglycerides, elevated cholesterol, chest pain, coughing, wheezing, runny nose and sore throat.
  • Obesity.

Natural Food Sources of Vanadium

Corn, buckwheat, garlic, blackpepper, wheat whole, radish, olive oil, apples, green beans, cabbage, carrot, tomatoes, mushrooms, onions, olives, beet root, peanut, parsley, dill, Snap beans, sunflower oil, lettuce and plum

Since vanadium can be a relatively toxic mineral, its use as a dietary supplement should be limited to dosages reflective of dietary intake (e.g., 500 – 1,000 mcg daily). The major concern is that excessive levels of vanadium have been suggested to be a factor in manic depression, as increased levels of vanadium are found in hair samples from manic patients, and these values fall towards normal levels with recovery.

Lithium : An essential nutrient in the human body that prevent mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Lithium is found in trace amounts in all soils primarily in the clay fraction, and to a lesser extent in the organic soil fraction. It is not yet known what particular function of lithium may make it an essential nutrient. It is thought to stabilize serotonin transmission in the nervous system; it influences sodium transport; and it may even increase lymphocytic (white blood cell) proliferation and depress the suppressor cell activity, thus strengthening the immune system. There is also speculation that lithium is in some way involved in cancer genesis or prevention.

Lithium is a naturally occurring trace element that is found in water, soil and a number of fruits, vegetables and other plants. In the early 1950s, psychologists discovered that very large doses of one form of lithium could help control and/or prevent episodes of mania that occur in bipolar disorder.  Lithium is taken up by all plants, although it appears not to be required for their growth and development.

Many nutrition and health experts believe that daily consumption of up to 2 mgs of lithium may be necessary for a number of important cellular interactions.  At those levels, lithium seems to carry no risk of side effects, and several major studies in the 1970s suggest that there may be some very important benefits.

Uses and Benefits of Lithium

  • Reduces aggressiveness, violence and self-destruction.
  • The biochemical mechanisms of action of lithium appear to be multifactorial and are intercorrelated with the functions of several enzymes, hormones and vitamins, as well as with growth and transforming factors.
  • Lithium appears to play an especially important role during the early fetal development as evidenced by the high lithium contents of the embryo during the early gestational period.
  • Helps regulate nerve impulses by regulating sodium and potassium
  • Increases lymphocytic production
  • Influences distribution of sodium and potassium
  • Influences sodium transport
  • Possible cancer suppression
  • Stabilizes serotonin transmission in the nervous system
  • Suppresses some cells within the immune system thus enhancing the immune system
  • Possibly helps increase brain matter (grey part)
  • Possibly protects the brain and nerves against glutamates

Deficiency Symptoms of Lithium

Toxicity: Tremors, drowsiness, headaches, confusion, restlessness, dizziness, psychomotor retardation, lethargy, coma.

Rich Food Sources of Lithium

  • Among plants, lithium is retained most easily in foods of the nightshade family of plants, which include tomatoes and cucumbers and mushrooms. Seaweed and kelp often contain high levels of lithium.
  • Apples, asparagus, bananas, cauliflower, cinnamon, cucumbers, lemons, lentils, marjoram, pepper, plant ash (shale), red cabbage,  sea vegetable, sugar cane, tomatoes, tobacco plant, mushrooms, whole grain foods, white cabbage and seeds.
  • In general, diets rich in grains and vegetables may be expected to provide more lithium than diets rich in animal proteins. However, due to the uneven distribution of lithium on the earth’s crust, a predominantly vegetarian diet is not necessarily lithium rich.

Lithium May Help Alzheimer’s

Three research studies in 1999 and 2000 from Wayne State
University of Medicine found that low levels of lithium used
to treat manic depression were also effective in protecting
the brain against Alzheimer’s disease. A key protein needed
to protect the brain against Alzheimer’s is Bc1-2 (related to
the B-cell lymphoma/ leukemia-2 gene). Lithium is the first
substance found to increase the concentration of Bc1-2 in
brains tissue.

Alzheimer’s is characterized by the existence of
neurofibrillary “tangles” in the brain. These tangles are
enabled by a destructive protein called glycogen synthase
kinase 3b (GSK-3b). Lithium has been found to decrease the
supply of destructive GSK-3b in brain tissue.

The Wayne State researchers also found that the gray matter
of patients treated with lithium over time grew by
approximately 3%, regenerating even after loss of brain cells
due to injury or disease.

Source: http://www.collectivewizdom.com/Lithium-LithiumRichFoods.html

100% Raw Food Diets May Not Be The Best For You.

A picture taken, of A Green Salad.

 

 

 

Raw Food Diets – The Ayurvedic Perspective

by Claudia Ward, L.Ac

There is much confusion as to what is the healthiest diet for us to consume–a predominantly raw food diet or a cooked-food diet? On the one hand we have raw food enthusiasts recommending a natural diet of 100% raw food. This is based on the fact that raw food is high in nutrients, enzymes, and prana (life energy). Some raw foodists can get quite fanatical about their philosophy that cooked food equals “dead food” which has lost most of its nutrients. Others have their Chinese or Ayurvedic doctor recommend mostly cooked foods and see a lot of their health issues disappear on such a diet. Now who is right and who is wrong? I myself have experienced the benefits of raw foods and especially juicing, which manifest in increased energy, clarity of mind, radiant complexion, and weight loss, just to mention a few. There are certainly many documented cases of individuals overcoming serious health issues, some life threatening, through adherence to a raw food regime. And of course I have to agree, that some types of cooked food are not very good for you when consumed over a long period of time – fried foods, heavily salted food, over-cooked vegetables, microwaved food, etc.

However, everyone is different, and diet must be individualized. There is no one single diet that is “best” for everyone. Some people will do best on raw, others on macrobiotic diets. Also, a 100% raw food diet can be problematic – even though a good healing diet, it can create problems in the long run.

Orange, pear, apple
Orange, pear, apple (Photo credit: Joe Lencioni)

Below are the symptoms and problems associated with a long-term strict raw food or vegan diet:

* a general lack of vitality

* low body temperature (always cold)

* a weak digestive system with a loss of digestive strength

* food cravings

* rapid growth of grey hair

* stalled weight loss due to low metabolism

* emaciation

* amenorrhea (menstrual cycles cease), even in young women

* loss of libido

* hair loss and nail problems

* dental erosion

* insomnia and neurological problems

* constipation

* diarrhea

* infertility

Obviously, the modern Western diet sickens us with its overload of meat, salt, bad fats, white sugar, white flour, and its deficiency of living foods.

There is no question that cooking deactivates some vital nutrients, including enzymes, but cooking also makes digestion less stressful. Many people with poor digestion don’t handle raw foods or beans very well, which is in part why macrobiotic diets may have worked for some people recovering from various maladies. The higher proportion of nutrients in raw food is useless if the food can’t be digested, absorbed and assimilated. Cooking contracts vegetable foods, concentrating more nutrients with less bulk. Bitter greens like spinach and kale are generally more edible when cooked, because cooking also eliminates the oxalic acid, which interferes with calcium absorption.

Cooking significantly improves the digestibility/bioavailability of starchy foods such as potatoes and yams, squashes, grains, and legumes. Legumes need to be soaked and cooked thoroughly, otherwise they contain enzyme blockers, that inhibit protein and carbohydrate metabolism. They also contain lectins, phytic acid and saponins that are deactivated by cooking. Lectins play a role in certain auto-immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory diseases. Green beans always need to be cooked until soft otherwise they are toxic! Raw beans are poisonous because they contain prussic acid, which is de-activated only by cooking. Beta-carotene absorption can be as low as 1-2% from raw vegetables such as carrots. Mild heating, such as steaming, appears to improve the extractability of beta-carotene from vegetables, and also its bioavailability. Mineral losses from cooking are insignificant.

 

diagram of a human digestive system

 

Lycopene in tomatoes has been hypothesized to be responsible for reducing the risk of some cancers and heart disease. The cooking of tomatoes with olive oil is a characteristic combination in the Mediterranean diet. Previous studies have shown that the absorption of lycopene is greater from cooked tomatoes.

The Ayurvedic Perspective:

There is not just one dietary approach that would be ideal for everyone. In order to correctly determine our optimal requirements we need to examine many factors. We have to take into account the individuals constitution (prakruti), the nature of their imbalance and symptoms (vikruti), the seasonal and climatic influences, stage of life, occupation, etc.

In general, those of a pitta, or pitta/kapha constitution, can do very well on some raw food in their diet, especially in the late spring and summer. But if someone has a severe vata imbalance, characterized by insomnia, excessive worry and anxiety, sense of being overwhelmed, spaceyness, dryness, gas, bloating, constipation, or amenorrhea, they may need nourishing, warm, moist, easily digestible cooked food as part of their healing journey.

Someone with a kapha imbalance can easily develop sinus problems, asthma, or allergies on a raw food diet.

My recommendation for those who chose to follow a raw food diet is to apply some of the ancient Ayurvedic wisdom to help avoid potential problems and help you stay well. Ayurveda recognizes our unique individual differences.

Balancing a Raw Food Diet With Ayurveda:

By using these simple Ayurvedic principles, any diet can be made more balancing:

* Daily warm oil massage (using unrefined, organic sesame oil), Ayurvedic-style, can be very helpful.

* Herbs with a calming action, including the commonly available chamomile tea. (Many other herbs are available, see an Ayurvedic health practitioner for recommendations.)

* Some raw-foodies report that running, cycling, swimming, or other aerobic exercise elevates their body temperature and also improves their digestion and the quality of sleep.

* Spices: ginger, cayenne, black pepper, cumin, coriander, fennel, etc. will improve digestion and metabolism. Pungent greens, like mustard, watercress, arugula, are alternatives to pungent spices.

* Tonic herbs: the Ayurvedic herbal blend triphala, strengthens the entire digestive system, and is extremely beneficial for the colon.

* Avoid cold food and liquids. Allow refrigerated items to return to room temperature before consuming.

 

ARS ginger

 

* Sipping hot water with meals, and in between meals, can help provide warmth to the body. The addition of a small piece of fresh ginger root (about 1/2 inch piece) to hot water will help considerably to increase agni (the digestive fire) and improve digestion and assimilation of nutrients. Adding fresh ginger or a little bit of flax seed oil or olive oil to a vegetable juice will increase the nutrient absorption, increase agni and not aggravate vata as much.

* Using a food blender, or consuming vegetable juices will decrease dryness.

* Adding fresh lime or lemon juice to foods also increases agni due to its sour taste.

* Using organic extra-virgin olive oil, walnut oil or flax seed oil on salads and other dry foods will help diminish their vata provoking quality and provide necessary fatty acids to the diet.

* Chewing a thin slice of ginger sprinkled with salt before a meal will get the digestive juices flowing.

*Chewing fennel seeds after a meal will prevent gas or bloating.

* Relaxing for at least 10 minutes after a meal without getting up and rushing immediately will promote digestion and counteract fatigue after eating.

When it comes to deciding what foods to eat use common sense, eat according to your constitution, eat mostly cooked foods when the weather is cold, when it is foggy or in the evenings. Salads are best eaten at lunchtime (when the digestive fire is strongest), in summer, or when the weather is hot. I am always amazed when I go back to Europe, how healthy and grounded my friends are, even though their diet is not really 100% nutritionally correct (lots of wine, bread, pastries). How is that possible? I think the answer is that they sit down with their friends or families and take time in preparing and enjoying their meals. Here in California a lot of people are just sipping some green protein shake and hurry off to their yoga class. Now when you lovingly prepare your food, and really look forward to eating it, and enjoy every bite, guess what happens? All the digestive juices are flowing at the right time and the body will extract all the nutrients it needs. Food that is gulped down quickly, just because one thinks it is healthy, but is not really enjoyed will actually be harmful to your health!! It does not get digested well and wreaks havoc throughout your system.

So take time in preparing fresh meals, enjoy your food in good company and relax after eating! Happiness is the best digestive aid!

Phosphorus : This mineral is also essential for growth and repair of cells in the body.

Phosphorus is another important mineral that is required in the body for the necessary for nourishment of the brain and the growth of the bones, teeth and hair. Phosphorus is also necessary for the growth and repair of cells in the body. It is also believed that phosphorus helps in maintaining proper heart health and prevention of cancer.  Along with calcium, phosphorus is required in order to have strong bones and teeth.

Phosphorus is the second most abundant mineral in the body and 85% of it is found in the bones. The rest of the body’s phosphorus is found in the blood, the fluid around and in cells, and in various organs like the heart, kidneys, brain, and muscles, where it is involved in many critical functions. It’s main purpose is for building strong bones and teeth, but this mineral is used by practically every cell in the body.


Health Benefits of Phosphorus

  • For strong bones and skeletal structure
  • For strong teeth, formation of tooth enamel, and healthy gums
  • For energy and metabolization of fats and starches
  • For growth and body repair
  • For heart regularity
  • For arthritis
  • For speedier recovery of burn victims
  • For cancer prevention
  • For cell health
  • Human body requires phosphate to produce energy and manage it. It also plays a crucial role in synthesizing proteins, fats and carbohydrates.
  • Phosphate is also required to maintain fluid and electrolyte balance in the body.
  • With so many uses to its credit phosphate is indeed very important for the body, and lack of the same can result in adverse effects on us.
  • Phosphorus is a vital component of DNA and RNA, and links the structures of both.
  • Phosphorus also plays a crucial role in transmission of nerve impulses within the body

Phosphorus Deficiency Symptoms

  • Almost eighty five percent of phosphorus in our body is found in the bones and the teeth, the remaining is found in the blood, muscles, organs such as brain, kidney, etc and fluids in and around the body cells.
  • Any deficiency of phosphorus in the body can produce a number of symptoms and diseases. Some of the commonly experienced symptoms of phosphorus deficiency are weak bones and teeth, tiredness, reduction in appetite, pain and stiffness in the joints, lack of energy, occurrence of infections and confusion.
  •  Besides these symptoms, there are numerous phosphorus deficiency diseases too which can occur if there is an imbalance in the calcium-phosphorus reserves in the body.
  • Such a phosphorus deficiency in humans can lead to diseases such as arthritis, rickets, pyorrhea and decaying teeth.

List of High Phosphorus Foods

Fruits:

  • Avocado
  • Blackcurrants
  • Breadfruit
  • Dates
  • Grapes
  • Guava
  • Kiwi
  • Lychee
  • Mulberries
  • Passionfruit
  • Pears
  • Pineapples
  • Plums
  • Pomegranate

Vegetables:

Nuts:

  • Almonds
  • Brazil Nuts
  • Buckwheat
  • Cashews
  • Oats
  • Pine Nuts/Pignolias
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Quinoa
  • Rye
  • Spelt
  • Sunflower Seeds
  • Wheat – Durum
  • Wheat – Hard Red
  • Wheat – Hard White

Most legumes are a good source of Phospherous but these are the highest.

  • Adzuki Beans
  • Black Beans
  • Black Eye Peas
  • Fava Beans
  • Edamame
  • Garbanzo Beans
  • Kidney Beans
  • Lima Beans
  • Navy Beans
  • Pigeon Beans
  • Pinto Beans
  • Soy Beans
  • White Beans
  • Winged Beans

Fruits and Vegetables: List Of Low Carbohydrates and Calories of your Favorite Fruits and Vegetable.

Fruits and vegetables are always good when included in a diet. Whether you believe in vegetarianism or not, make sure that you include some of these low carb vegetables and fruit in your daily diet. Stay fit and healthy.

Vegetables are part of a healthy diet but not all vegetables are equal. Some

contain significantly more calories and carbs than others do.

Choose your vegetables wisely. If you are able to afford them, please choose organic foods whenever possible

Unless otherwise stated, the vegetable food counts (carbohydrates and calories) are for average size portions of 3½ ounces, which is 100g.

Where the vegetables are listed as boiled or baked, this means plain boiled or baked with nothing yet added such as butter or oil. Unless otherwise stated, the food counts are for fresh (not canned) vegetables.

Low carbohydrate vegetables are non-starchy and low in carbs. A low carb vegetable diet is the perfect way to stay lean and fit, as these vegetables have all the necessary fiber, minerals and vitamins required by the body. Though the exact carb count depends on the serving size, these low carb vegetables should be a daily part of your diet, no matter what the quantity. Let us list a few low carb vegetables and fruits. When looking at some of the carb counts, know that fiber is not counted as carbohydrates.

Low Carb Vegetables

An average vegetable portion of 100g equals 3½ ounces Calories per portion stated Carbohydrates per portion stated
Aubergine (eggplant), raw, 100g 15 2.2
Alfalfa sprouts, raw, 100g 24 0.4
Artichoke-Jerusalem, boiled, 100g 41 10.6
Asparagus, boiled, 100g 22 4
Asparagus, canned, drained, 100g 19 3
Bamboo shoots, canned, 100g 11 0.7
Beansprouts mung, raw, 100g 31 4
Beetroot, raw, 100g 36 4.6
Beetroot, boiled, 100g 46 9.5
Beetroot, pickled, drained, 100g 28 5.6
Broccoli, green, boiled, 100g 24 1.3
Broccoli, green, raw, 100g 33 1.8
Broccoli, purple, boiled, 100g 19 1.3
Broccoli, purple, raw, 100g 35 2.6
BrusselsSprouts, boiled, 100g 35 3.1
Cabbage spring, boiled, 100g 7 0.6
Cabbage Chinese, raw, 100g 12 1.4
Cabbage red, raw, 100g 21 3.7
CabbageSavoy, raw, 100g 27 3.9
Cabbage, white, raw, 100g 27 5
Capsicum Pepper, green, raw 100g 15 2.6
Capsicum Pepper, red, raw 100g 32 6.4
Carrots, old, boiled, 100g 24 4.9
Carrots, young, raw, 100g 30 6
Cassava chips, 100g 354 92
Cassava, steamed, 100g 142 37
Cauliflower, boiled, 100g 28 2.3
Celeriac, raw, 100g 18 2.3
Celery, raw, 100g 7 0.9
Corn, baby sweetcorn, boiled, 100g 24 2.7
Corn kernels, canned, 100g 123 27
Corn kernels, raw 100g 93 17
Corn-on-cob, boiled, plain, 100g 66 11.6
Courgette (Zucchini), raw, 100g 18 1.8
Curly Kale, raw, 100g 35 1.4
Cucumber, unpeeled, raw 100g 10 1.5
Chicory, raw, 100g 14 1
Eggplant (aubergine), raw, 100g 15 2.2
Endive (Escarole), 100g 11 2.8
Fennel, raw, 100g 12 1.8
Garlic, fresh, raw, 100g 98 16
Leeks, raw, 100g 22 2.9
Lettuce leaf, butterhead, raw, 100 12 1.2
Lettuce, cos, romaine, raw, 100g 16 1.7
Lettuce, Iceberg, raw, 100g 13 1.9
Marrow, boiled, 100g 9 1.6
Mushrooms, common, raw, 100g 22 3.4
Potatoes, new, boiled, 100g 75 18
Potatoes, old, raw, 100g 86 20
Okra, raw, 100g 31 3
Onions, raw, 100g 64 7.9
Parsnip, raw, 100g 64 12.5
Peas, frozen, raw, 100g 66 9.3
Peas, fresh, raw, 100g 83 11.3
Pumpkin, raw, 100g 13 2.2
Radish, red, raw, 100g 12 2
Spinach, raw, 100g 25 1.6
Squash, butternut, baked, 100g 32 7.4
Squash spaghetti, baked, 100g 75 18
Zucchini (Courgette), raw, 100g 18 1.8
Sweet potato, baked, 100g 115 28
Tomatoes, canned, & liquid, 100g 16 3
Tomatoes cherry, raw, 100g 18 3
Tomatoes, ordinary, raw, 100g 17 3
Water chestnuts, canned, 100g 28 7
Watercress, raw, 100g 22 0.4
Yam, baked, 100g 153 37.5
Zucchini (Courgette), raw, 100g 18 1.8

Apart from these low carb diet vegetables, the following vegetables are also very fiber and mineral rich, without carrying a lot of carbohydrates.

  • Collards
  • Mustard Greens
  • Herbs like parsley, cilantro, basil, rosemary and thyme
  • Sea vegetables like nori
  • Okra
  • Avocados
  • Green beans and wax beans
  • Scallions or green onions
  • Tomatoes
  • Artichokes
  • Carrots
  • Turnip
  • Fresh ginger and garlic

Fruits are part of a healthy diet. However, some fruits contain significantly more carbs than others do.   If you are following a low carbohydrate diet and want to include fruits, choose the best low carbs fruits. Additionally, if you want to maximize the health benefits and help our planet, eat organically grown low carb fruits whenever possible.

It’s best to avoid sweetened, canned, or dried fruit. Most dried fruit has sugar added during processing.

Dried fruits are not part of a weight loss diet. Even berries such as blueberries and cranberries have added sugar when bought as dried.

The calories in fruit count are then approximately the same as dried raisins. If you shop around, it is possible to buy sugar-free dried fruit.  This chart gives the number of calories and carbohydrates in fresh fruit.

Fruits, whole grains, oatmeal and vegetables contain complex carbohydrates. If you want to reduce or maintain your weight, a low carb diet can definitely help you. The diet may help solve all weight related problems like heart disease and diabetes. Lots of fresh, organic fruits and vegetables should be included in the diet as they supply the necessary nutrients to your body. Deficiency of nutrients can lead to various health complications and fatigue, which can affect your work and health. Low carb foods having a low glycemic index help protect your heart from damage due to fats. Dietitians usually recommend low carb diet to diabetics.

Low Carb Fruits

Per single fruit or the portion stated Calories per fruit or the portion stated Carbohydrates per fruit or the portion stated
Apple (with the peel) 81 21
Apricot 17 4
Avocado 306 12
Banana 105 27
Blackberries (½ cup) 37 9
Blackcurrants (½ cup) 36 9
Blueberries fresh (½ cup) 41 10
Cherries (½ cup) 52 12
Cranberries fresh raw (½ cup), 23 6
Currants Red fresh (½ cup) 31 8
Dates dried/sugar (½ cup) 280 62
Date 1 fresh/unsweetened 7 2
Fig (medium) 37 10
Gooseberries fresh (½ cup) 34 8
Grapes (10 medium seedless) 36 9
Grapefruit (1 medium half) 46 12
Guava (½ cup) 42 10
Kiwi (medium) 46 11
Lemon (with peel) 22 12
Lime (with peel) 18 10
Lychees 1 oz. 19 5
Mango fresh 135 35
Melon Canteloupe (1 half) 94 22
Melon Honeydew (1 tenth) 46 12
Nectarine (medium) 67 16
Olives green (pitted) 1 oz. 33 0.4
Olives black (pitted) 1 oz. 96 2.5
Orange 65 16
Papaya (½ cup cubed) 27 7
Passion Fruit (medium) 18 4
Paw Paw 34 7
Peach 37 10
Pear (medium) 98 25
Pineapple fresh (½ cup cubed) 39 10
Plum 36 9
Prune (1 dried & pitted) 20 5
Raisins (dried ½ cup) 110 29
Raspberry (½ cup) 31 7
Rhubarb (½ cup cubed) 14 3
Satsuma 37 9
Strawberries (½ cup) 23 5
Tangerine 37 9
Tomato (large) 26 6
Tomato Cherry 3 1

Fruits and Vegetables wallpaper no84910

If you want to have a handy list of low carb fruits and vegetables, which you can always keep with you, here is one for you.

Low Carb Foods List – Vegetables and Fruits

Sprouts like bean, alfalfa, etc.
Greens – lettuces, spinach, chard, etc.
Hearty Greens – collards, mustard greens, kale, etc.
Radicchio and endive count as greens
Herbs – parsley, cilantro, basil, rosemary, thyme, etc.
Bok Choy
Celery
Radishes
Sea Vegetables
Cabbage/sauerkraut)
Mushrooms
Jicama
Avocado
Cucumbers
Asparagus
Green Beans and Wax Beans
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Peppers like green bell peppers, red bell peppers, jalapeño peppers
Summer Squash
Zucchini
Scallions or green onions
Bamboo Shoots
Leeks
Brussels Sprouts
Snow Peas (pods)
Tomatoes
Eggplant
Tomatillos

Low Carb Foods List - Fruits
Artichokes
Fennel
Onions
Okra
Spaghetti Squash
Celery Root (Celeriac)
Carrots
Turnip
Water Chestnuts
Pumpkin
Lemon or Lime (small amount)
Passion Fruits
Rhubarb
Raspberries
Blackberries
Cranberries
Strawberries
Casaba Melon
Papaya
Watermelon
Peaches
Nectarines
Blueberries
Cantaloupes
Honeydew Melons
Apples
Guavas
Apricots
Grapefruit

I hope you found the above lists of fruits and vegetables helpful. Now that you know about low carb foods, you can design your own low carb diet. These food items will keep you fit and active and you will be able to achieve your goal of weight loss. It is necessary to consult a physician before opting for any diet. Be sure that you don’t have any health problem and see to it that you get all the essential nutrients when on diet.

Fruits And Vegetable : List of Low and High Sugar Fruit and Vegetable.

Mother Nature has the unique ability to create foods that have an entire web of nutritional and healing benefits. In fact, we are still discovering and learning about the compounds found in plant foods that contribute to our wellness and longevity.

A healthy diet begins with fresh vegetables and fruits which play a major role of a balanced diet that includes foods that are low in cholesterol, fat, and needless sugar. Try to add a portion of fruits and vegetables to each meal you eat, if you want to eat healthy.

Talking about fruits and vegetable , they have been natural essential diet of human being since very old times. Besides easily digestible and good source as food, fruits and vegetable are served as medicine, treat ailments, retain and balance the moisture level in the body. They are full with vitamins, minerals, enzymes.

When you are on a diet, especially low carb diet, you should beware of high sugar fruits and vegetable. Sugar is widely considered to be one of the most dangerous substances for the body. You should avoid it at all costs.

Many diets focus on restricting carbohydrates, Hypothyroid help here which may be important if you are in the early stage of a weight loss plan. Nutritionists generally emphasize that eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables is still appropriate for most people.

Fruits That Are Low  In Sugar

Apple (sliced)
Apricot (4 oz.)

Avocado :7g
Blackberry
Blueberry
Boysenberry
Cantaloupe : 6.3g

Cranberry : 4g
Cherry (sour, sweet, 10 medium)
Coconut meat (1 oz. or 1 cup shredded/grated, not packed)
Coconut milk
Currant (red, black, white)
Elderberry
Gooseberry : 9g
Grape (10 medium)

Grapefruit, Red : 6.6g
Honeydew melon
Kiwi fruit (1 medium)
Kumquat (1 medium)
Lemon/Lime (2 inch diameter)
Lemon/Lime Juice (1 oz)

Melon, Red Water : 8g
Mulberry

Olive : 3g
Orange (sections, without membrane)

Papaya : 8g

Passion Fruit : 5.8g
Peach (1 med, 4 oz.)

Pear : 11.5g
Persimmon (American, Japanese, 1 medium)
Pineapple (1 oz)
Plum
Raspberry
Strawberry
Tangelo (1 medium)
Tangerine (1 medium)

Tomato : 1.9g
Watermelon

Very High Sugar Fruits

Banana : 20.4g
Fig : 19g
Grapes : 15.5g
Guava : 17g
Kumquat : 16g
Lychee : 18g
Mango : 15g
Persimmon : 18.6g
Pomegranate : 17g

Except where noted, all have less than 10 gm carbs in a half cup serving.

Vegetables That Are Low In Sugar

Alfalfa sprouts
Asparagus
Avocado
Bamboo sprouts
Bean sprouts
Beet greens
Bell pepper (sweet green)
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage — all kinds
Carrot
Cauliflower
Celeriac (celery root, knob celery)
Celery
Collard greens
Cucumber
Dandelion greens
Eggplant
Endive
Escarole
Garlic (1 clove)
Kale
Leek
Lettuce — all kinds
Mung bean sprouts
Mushroom
Mustard greens
Okra
Onion (1 oz.)
Radish
Red-leaf chicory (Arugula)
Romaine (cos)
Shallot
Spaghetti squash
Spinach
Squashes — summer
String bean
Swiss chard
Tomato
Turnip greens
Watercress
Zucchini

 Vegetables That Are High In Sugar
Why are carrots listed in both categories? Carrot juice is high in sugars (about 5 gm), while
cooked carrots are low (about 3 gm).

Beets
Carrots (depends on diet)
Corn
Parsnips
Peas
Plantains
Potatoes in all forms
Winter Squashes (particularly acorn and butternut)

What are phytochemicals?

Phytochemicals are compounds that have been found to protect the body from chronic disease patterns. These conditions are becoming more common, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancers, and neurodegeneration like dementia, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Research is finding that a diet rich in phytochemicals protects the body from physical and environmental stressors that lead to chronic disease. Some of these phytochemicals are called polyphenols and phenolic acids and are abundant in fruits and vegetables. (1) Some examples are:

  • Quercitin: Falls under the class of a flavonoid, and sometimes a distinction is made between it and other polyphenols. It has anti-inflammatory properties, is an antioxidant, and also has been found to reduce blood pressure and lower LDL cholesterol. LDL cholesterol can sometimes indicate the prevalence of poor, unhealthy fats in the diet and too much processed, refined sugar. Quercitin is found in green tea, red onion, broccoli, and green leafy vegetables.
  • Anthocyanin: Common in berries and responsible for their beautiful colors! These include blueberries, cranberries, raspberries, bing cherries, black current, and acai. Anthocyanin actually acts as a sunscreen for plants by absorbing damaging UV light, so it any surprise that in our own bodies, it has been found to be a potent antioxidant? The sun is one source of free radical damage, and anthocyanins can help mitigate the effects of oxidative stress.

 All sugary food is expansive.

  • Fruit sugars are about 50% glucose and 50% fructose.
  • The body’s cells absolutely need glucose to generate energy for the body, especially the brain and central nervous system.
  • The glycemic index (GI) of a food indicates how much a food will affect insulin secretion.
  • Fructose has no effect on insulin secretion. Glucose does.
  • This is why agave nectar, which is up to 90% fructose, has a low glycemic index. Contrary to its popularity, agave nectar is not a healthy sweetener.

Other things to know:

  • Fructose also does not trigger the release of leptin, which gives the feeling of satiety. Glucose does.
  • Fructose stimulates the release of ghrelin, which stimulates the appetite. (2)

The leptin/ghrelin dialogue in fructose and glucose is one reason why many people overeat. People who overeat are typically binging on bread (processed breads are made with high fructose corn syrup), sugar, dairy, and fruits. Even though fruit sugars are about 50/50 glucose and fructose, it is still wise to pay attention to any amount of fructose in the diet.